Florence Sessoms

New to our website - more content on turfgrass seed production

Did you know that the University of Minnesota conducts research on turfgrass seed production in northern Minnesota? If you are interested in learning more, our website now has information on Seed Production Research at Magnusson Research Farm. We have annual progress reports, which contain results of turfgrass seed production research such as variety trials, winter hardiness trials and other research involving fertility and herbicides.

Wed, 02/10/2021 - 10:34


Turfgrass Science Team at the 2020 ASA-CSSA-SSSA Virtual Annual Meeting

The Turfgrass Science team from the University of Minnesota gave two presentations and presented two posters at this year’s ASA-CSSA-SSSA Virtual Annual Meeting. Below is a listing of the abstracts, along with links to the poster PDF files.

Fri, 12/18/2020 - 11:42


New research publications from our team - 11/12/20

Learn more about our research! Two new research articles from our group have been published in Crop Science. Florence Sessoms and Eric Watkins have published an article on heat stress in cool season turfgrasses, and Dominic Petrella and Eric Watkins have published an article on the differences in shade responses in the fine fescues.

Thu, 11/12/2020 - 11:28


Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: AMF and their interactions with turfgrass species

By Florence Sessoms

In the first part of this series, I described what arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are and how they can benefit plants. In this post, I will discuss how AMF might benefit turfgrasses. Cool-season and warm-season grasses are both able to be infected with mycorrhizal fungi. A quick literature review showed that several benefits of AMF were observed with turfgrasses such as improved biomass, nutrient content, decrease in weed incidence and disease severity (Table 1). 

Mon, 06/08/2020 - 09:26


Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: tiny friends with big impact

By Florence Sessoms

What are they?

Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF) are soil microorganisms able to form mutualistic symbiosis with most terrestrial plants. Spores that are present in soil germinate, infect the root system, and form arbuscule structures inside the cells (Figure 1). Arbuscules are the site of nutrients exchange between the plant and the fungi. Another characteristic of this symbiosis is the presence of a large mycorrhizal network around the root system.

Thu, 06/04/2020 - 11:09


Fine fescue seed production in Minnesota

By Florence Sessoms

Cool-season turfgrass seed production in Minnesota is localized in Roseau and Lake of the Woods counties in northern Minnesota. Perennial ryegrass is the primary turfgrass being produced for a total of 55,000 to 60,000 acres. Perennial ryegrass is intercropped with spring wheat to allow a better survival during the harsh winter months present up north. Also, the presence of another cash crop, such as spring wheat, allows the farmer to get some income from the field in the first year while the grass is establishing as described in Figure 1.

Sun, 01/05/2020 - 16:53


Turfgrass Science Team at the 2019 ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting

The Turfgrass Science team from the University of Minnesota was well-represented at this year’s ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting held on November 10-13, 2019 in San Antonio, TX.  Seven people gave oral presentations and five people presented posters. Additionally, congratulations go to two members of our group who placed in the graduate student oral presentation contests:

Wed, 12/04/2019 - 10:11


Different shade, different results

By Dominic Petrella

It is a common misconception that turfgrasses respond the same to neutral and foliar shade conditions. However, this is not true, and even some of the best turfgrasses for shady areas exhibit contrasting growth under these different types of shade. Let’s define the two types of shade:

Wed, 10/16/2019 - 14:06


University of Minnesota Grass Seed Field Day

By Eric Watkins

Thu, 08/22/2019 - 12:12