Turfgrass Science News

Recently, we’ve received several questions regarding a new product offering from The Scott’s Company called “Roundup for Lawns.”  There are several versions of this product, including both Northern and Southern grass options.  The Northern grass product, for use on Minnesota lawns, states that the product “kills weeds, not the lawn.”  Most of us are familiar with the original version of Roundup, which contains the active ingredient glyphosate, and we know that glyphosate is a non-selective vegetation killer- meaning that it kills most plants that it is sprayed on.  So, how does Roundup for Lawns not kill the entire lawn? 

Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 12:00pm

Do you have a weedy lawn or a lawn currently composed of high maintenance turfgrass species and you want transition to something that takes less work and is better for the environment?  If so, please have a look at this series of 7 videos sponsored by the Minnesota Turf and Grounds Foundation.  This process is best accomplished in the fall from August 15th to September 15th, but spring conversions are possible as well.  Following the last step, erosion control, you'll want to be sure to keep the seedbed moist throughout the germination period, which is generally 7-14 days.

Monday, April 3, 2017 - 5:45pm

            The winter of 2016/17 was anything but normal and it feels like we’re getting used to saying that every spring.  An exceptionally warm November, over an inch of rainfall (and therefore ice) on Christmas, golf in mid-February, a general lack of snow cover, and temperatures more than 10 degrees below average in early-March are just a few of the ups and downs that we’ve experienced in the Twin Cities metro region this winter.  So, what does this mean for turf and golf courses, you might ask?

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 6:45pm

Educational Opportunity: The 2018 Great Lakes School of Turfgrass Science Online Course (For Professionals) is set for January 2nd – March 23th, 2018.

Friday, October 20, 2017 - 4:00pm

By James Wolfin, Graduate Research Assistant

The turf lawn accounts for nearly 2% of the continental United States land cover, and has become engrained in the architecture of many United States neighborhoods and landscapes.  As urban and suburban areas continue to expand, we can expect this number to increase as many yards, store fronts, and commercial buildings are installed to accompany properties. 

Thursday, November 17, 2016 - 11:30am

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What is Turfgrass Science?

The University of Minnesota's Turfgrass Science Program conducts field-based research and offers education and consultation to both commercial turfgrass managers and homeowners caring for their yards.

For turfgrass or home lawn questions, contact:

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Ask a Master Gardener

For questions related to turfgrass extension, contact:

Sam Bauer, Extension Educator
sjbauer@umn.edu or 612-626-3085
Sam Bauer

Dr. Brian Horgan, Professor
bphorgan@umn.edu or 612-624-0782
Dr. Brian Horgan

For degree questions, contact:

Dr. Eric Watkins, Professor
ewatkins@umn.edu or 612-624-7496
Dr. Eric Watkins