Lawn https://turf.umn.edu/ en New research publication from our team - 1/5/22 https://turf.umn.edu/new-research-publication-our-team-1522 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">New research publication from our team - 1/5/22</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/286" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">monc0003</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 01/05/2022 - 09:02</span> <div class="panel-display brenham-flipped clearfix"> <div class="container-fluid"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-12 radix-layouts-header panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_publish_date" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-publish-date"> <div class="field field--name-field-dl-publish-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item"><time datetime="2022-01-05T09:02:20Z" class="datetime">Wed, 01/05/2022 - 09:02</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-8 radix-layouts-content panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-dl-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Learn more about our research! A new article from our group has been published in the <em>Journal of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism</em>. This research found that park users have a preference for natural turfgrass lawns and are more hesitant to use artificial turfgrass lawns, which has implications for decision-makers choosing between these two options. </p> <p>Barnes, M.R. and E. Watkins. 2022. Differences in likelihood of use between artificial and natural turfgrass lawns. <em>Journal of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism</em> Vol 37, March 2022, 100480. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jort.2021.100480" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jort.2021.100480</a></p></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_tags" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-tags"> <div class="flex-display-list field field--name-field-dl-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/986" hreflang="en">Michael Barnes</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/416" hreflang="en">Eric Watkins</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1191" hreflang="en">artificial turf</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/36" hreflang="en">Lawn</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 radix-layouts-sidebar panel-panel"> <div > </div> </div> </div> </div> </div><!-- /.brenham-flipped --> Wed, 05 Jan 2022 15:02:20 +0000 monc0003 3826 at https://turf.umn.edu Unseen turf: Overlooked lawns and their potential for sustainability https://turf.umn.edu/unseen-turf-overlooked-lawns-and-their-potential-sustainability <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Unseen turf: Overlooked lawns and their potential for sustainability</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/286" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">monc0003</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 06/23/2021 - 19:26</span> <div class="panel-display brenham-flipped clearfix"> <div class="container-fluid"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-12 radix-layouts-header panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_publish_date" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-publish-date"> <div class="field field--name-field-dl-publish-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item"><time datetime="2021-06-23T19:26:06Z" class="datetime">Wed, 06/23/2021 - 19:26</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-8 radix-layouts-content panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-dl-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>By Michael Barnes</p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>As an environmental social scientist my research gaze is attracted to areas where significant numbers of individuals or groups of individuals congregate together and to understand those spaces and places better in order to improve human health and well-being alongside ecological health. Thus, my focus has been on urban green spaces, specifically in the form of parks, urban lawns, and golf courses. Lately though, I’ve begun to think more about lawns that are overlooked or ‘unseen’. There are a multitude of spaces within the urban ecosystem where people rarely go, or even see. These ‘unseen’ lawns do not go unmanaged however, and still require time, attention, and inputs similar to their more frequently used and viewed counterparts. Lawns can be overlooked for a number of reasons, through non-use, alternative use, or inaccessibility. Let’s take a closer look at two examples of these ‘unseen’ lawns. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h1><span><span><span><span><span><span>Airport Lawns</span></span></span></span></span></span></h1> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Think about the last time you were sitting on a plane before takeoff and looked out the window (it might have been awhile due to the pandemic!), but more often than not you probably saw some type of lawn out your window between the tarmac, service roads, and terminals. Lawns at airports have contextual considerations, none of which is more important than attempting to minimize their attractiveness to birds. While this is of course the primary consideration of these lawns, several questions remain around management, maintenance and how to make these large swaths of turf multifunctional and sustainable. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h1><span><span><span><span><span><span>Utility Right of Ways</span></span></span></span></span></span></h1> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Right of ways (</span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Figure 1) for the unfamiliar are a form of property access concession for utilities to be able to install, access, and service a variety of infrastructure such as power lines or pipelines. Like airports, these right of ways or ‘easements’ have specific considerations to make sure that service crews can reliably and safely access the site. These right of ways in many cases cover tens to hundreds of miles and could provide a multitude of benefits while remaining equally accessible. Are there ways to transition such spaces for contiguous wildlife habitat while easing the burden of maintenance at the same time? </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-drupal-entity media--view-mode-"><div alt="A pipeline with mowed turf alongside it" data-embed-button="media_browser" data-entity-embed-display="media_image" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="0528ff72-ea22-4089-9297-71e58b7b0b91" data-langcode="en" title="Barnes Fig 1" class="embedded-entity"> <img src="/sites/turf.umn.edu/files/2021-06/Barnes%20Fig%201.jpg" alt="A pipeline with mowed turf alongside it" title="Barnes Fig 1" typeof="foaf:Image" /></div> <figcaption>Figure 1. An example of a pipeline with it’s right of way lawn. Photo by: Nolan Krattinger</figcaption></figure><p><span><span><span><span><span><span>These and other ‘unseen’ lawns could provide a fruitful route for expansion of sustainability efforts while also minimizing disruption for people given their lack of active use by individuals. An adjustment in management strategies alongside specific mixtures used in these locations could bring significant benefits both economically and ecologically. For example, adoption of alternative turfgrass species that are slower growing could help alleviate mowing frequency for these often less accessible locations. The consideration of these ‘unseen’ lawns can help to broaden the conversation outside of the traditional focus of the majority of the research in green spaces and push the multifunctionality of such spaces to help achieve sustainable ecosystems. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_tags" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-tags"> <div class="flex-display-list field field--name-field-dl-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/986" hreflang="en">Michael Barnes</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/36" hreflang="en">Lawn</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1246" hreflang="en">airport</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1251" hreflang="en">right of ways</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 radix-layouts-sidebar panel-panel"> <div > </div> </div> </div> </div> </div><!-- /.brenham-flipped --> Thu, 24 Jun 2021 00:26:05 +0000 monc0003 3611 at https://turf.umn.edu Looking for lawns! https://turf.umn.edu/looking-lawns <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Looking for lawns!</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/286" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">monc0003</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 06/21/2021 - 15:03</span> <div class="panel-display brenham-flipped clearfix"> <div class="container-fluid"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-12 radix-layouts-header panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_publish_date" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-publish-date"> <div class="field field--name-field-dl-publish-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item"><time datetime="2021-06-21T15:03:04Z" class="datetime">Mon, 06/21/2021 - 15:03</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-8 radix-layouts-content panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-dl-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div alt="green residential lawn with several white clover flowers" data-embed-button="media_browser" data-entity-embed-display="media_image" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="9e4baca6-25f2-4fc6-a4b6-e29ca416e365" data-langcode="en" title="residential lawn" class="embedded-entity"> <img src="/sites/turf.umn.edu/files/2021-06/LTER%20tweet.jpg" alt="green residential lawn with several white clover flowers" title="residential lawn" typeof="foaf:Image" /></div> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Do you live in the Twin Cities area and have a lawn that you manage or mow? We are looking for lawns to study as part of the Minneapolis-St. Paul Metro Area Urban Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) project. This new research is looking at how urban stressors affect the ecological structure and functioning of urban nature.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>If you are in the Twin Cities 7-county metro area and are interested in participating, please <a href="http://z.umn.edu/6ye1">read more about the project</a> and find out how you can sign up. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>You can also learn about the UMN Turfgrass Science team’s <a href="/node/3516">role studying lawns and bee lawns</a> in this new project and check out the <a href="http://mspurbanlter.umn.edu">MSP LTER project website</a>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_tags" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-tags"> <div class="flex-display-list field field--name-field-dl-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/36" hreflang="en">Lawn</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/131" hreflang="en">Bee Lawn</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/1236" hreflang="en">LTER</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 radix-layouts-sidebar panel-panel"> <div > </div> </div> </div> </div> </div><!-- /.brenham-flipped --> Mon, 21 Jun 2021 20:03:04 +0000 monc0003 3591 at https://turf.umn.edu Smart Irrigation Month https://turf.umn.edu/news/smart-irrigation-month <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Smart Irrigation Month</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/286" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">monc0003</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 08/05/2019 - 16:28</span> <div class="panel-display brenham-flipped clearfix"> <div class="container-fluid"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-12 radix-layouts-header panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_publish_date" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-publish-date"> <div class="field field--name-field-dl-publish-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item"><time datetime="2019-08-05T16:00:00Z" class="datetime">Mon, 08/05/2019 - 16:00</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-8 radix-layouts-content panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-dl-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>By Dan Sandor</p> <div alt="irrigation month logo" data-embed-button="media_browser" data-entity-embed-display="media_image" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="a76bb816-832c-4239-925c-d8c472d1a18e" title="irrigation month logo" data-langcode="und" class="embedded-entity"> <img src="/sites/turf.umn.edu/files/files/media/logo.jpg" alt="irrigation month logo" title="irrigation month logo" typeof="foaf:Image" /></div> <p>July is annually recognized by the <a href="https://irrigation.org/" target="_blank">Irrigation Association</a> as <a href="https://irrigation.org/IA/Resources/Smart-Irrigation-Month/IA/Resources/Smart-Irrigation-Month-Home.aspx?hkey=3eb601e9-ab60-4390-9e0a-b11e4b14e59b" target="_blank">Smart Irrigation Month</a>, but what does it mean to utilize smart irrigation? In a time of smartphones, smart watches, smart appliances, and smart homes why shouldn’t your lawn’s sprinkler system be just as intelligent? Over the last decade, new improved technologies, such as soil moisture sensors and smart irrigation controllers have entered the residential and commercial market and can be used to upgrade your current sprinkler system.</p> <p>In the Land of 10,000 Lakes, water is seemingly plentiful, but an abundance is still no excuse for negligent water use, whether it’s indoor or outdoor. Of course it’s much easier to identify sources of indoor water waste, such as leaving the faucet running while brushing your teeth or washing half loads of laundry or dishes. However homeowners and property managers may be unaware of how much water is applied, and therein wasted, through their programmed irrigation schedules; it is very likely more water is being applied than is actual necessary.</p> <p>It is important to bear in mind that irrigation should be only utilized as a supplement to rainfall, and not used as the primary source of water for the lawn. Here in the Twin Cities we received a combined 9.4 inches of rain during May and June this spring (Figure 1), which was approximately 25% more rain than our 30-year average during these months; so the likelihood of even needing to even irrigate so far this spring / early summer has been very minimal. The national weather service provides <a href="https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/datatools/normals" target="_blank">historical, 30-year temperature and rainfall data</a> for most cities in each state and you can compare the 2019 year-to-date precipitation against the 30-year data for your area.</p> <div class="callout-image-caption"> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-drupal-entity media--view-mode-"><div alt="Bar chart with historical and 2019 rainfall data for May through June in inches. " data-embed-button="media_browser" data-entity-embed-display="media_image" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="4a2afdd7-a517-4eb1-983b-b7d2c5b84eb7" title="Historical versus 2019 rainfall bar chart" data-langcode="und" class="embedded-entity"> <img src="/sites/turf.umn.edu/files/files/media/fig_1_7.jpg" alt="Bar chart with historical and 2019 rainfall data for May through June in inches. " title="Historical versus 2019 rainfall bar chart" typeof="foaf:Image" /></div> <figcaption>Figure 1. 30-year average rainfall data during May + June rainfall compared against 2019 observed data for May + June (*complete 2019 May + June rainfall data were unavailable for NW Minnesota cities). National Centers for Environmental Information, 2019.</figcaption></figure></div> <div class="callout-image-caption"> </div> <p>So now that we have transitioned from a wet spring into summer’s heat, how can you make smart choices and participate in smart irrigation month by watering more wisely? To begin with, the most efficient way to irrigate your lawn is to simply leave the controller in the OFF position and only irrigate when absolutely necessary (when the turf begins to show some drought stress). You may consider lowering your expectations as well; a little brown isn’t necessarily bad and the turf will recover upon significant rainfall or after the next scheduled irrigation event (Figure 2).</p> <div class="callout-image-caption"> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-drupal-entity media--view-mode-"><div alt="Non-irrigated plot with brown turf before receiving precipitation; after precipitation, the non-irrigated plots are mostly green " data-embed-button="media_browser" data-entity-embed-display="media_image" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="6070ec50-669c-43f5-bb0e-126b0dd6f04d" title="Non-irrigated plots before and after receiving precipitation" data-langcode="und" class="embedded-entity"> <img src="/sites/turf.umn.edu/files/files/media/fig_2_7.jpg" alt="Non-irrigated plot with brown turf before receiving precipitation; after precipitation, the non-irrigated plots are mostly green " title="Non-irrigated plots before and after receiving precipitation" typeof="foaf:Image" /></div> <figcaption>Figure 2. Top: A non-irrigated Kentucky bluegrass lawn in St. Paul, MN that had not received any rain for over two weeks during the heat of the summer. Bottom: The same lawn after receiving 2.2 inches of rain during the two-week interval. In the area immediately above the blue-dashed line in the top photo you can see irrigated plots of the Kentucky bluegrass, however in the bottom photo it is more difficult to discern the irrigated from non-irrigated plot.</figcaption></figure></div> <div class="callout-image-caption"> </div> <p>The <a href="https://www.revisor.mn.gov/laws/2003/0/44/" target="_blank">state of Minnesota requires</a> all automated irrigation systems installed after July 1, 2003 to have technologies installed, such as a rain sensor, soil moisture sensor, or smart controller, to prevent or stop unnecessary irrigation during periods of sufficient moisture. Some advantages and disadvantages of these three technologies are listed in Table 1 below.</p> <div class="callout-image-caption">Table 1. Advantages and disadvantages of rain sensors, smart controllers, and soil moisture sensors.</div> <table><thead><tr><th>Technology</th> <th>Advantages</th> <th>Disadvantages</th> </tr></thead><tbody><tr><td> <h3>Rain Sensors</h3> </td> <td> <ul><li>Easily affordable ($20-30)</li> <li>Many are available as wireless models</li> <li>Relatively easy to install</li> </ul></td> <td> <ul><li>Cork discs can become less sensitive to rain over time as discs age and are continually exposed to elements (short life span, ~1 to 3 years)</li> <li>Sometimes installed incorrectly (indoors, under tree branches, roof overhangs and / or gutters), inhibiting their maximum water-savings potential</li> <li>Water savings are minimal compared to smart controllers and/or soil moisture sensors</li> </ul></td> </tr><tr><td> <h3>Smart Controllers</h3> </td> <td> <ul><li>Uses real-time, local, environmental conditions to adjust scheduled run-times</li> <li>Some of the newest models work with smart technology like Amazon Alexa and Google Home</li> <li>Able to isolate specific zones from the smart irrigation adjustments</li> <li>Use either auto-adjustment or user-adjusted settings to further reduce water use</li> </ul></td> <td> <ul><li>Purchasing costs can be high (&gt;$150-200) depending on the number of zones</li> <li>Most require a smartphone to adjust and / or maximize program settings</li> <li>Requires strong, continual access to Wi-Fi to make water-savings adjustments</li> </ul></td> </tr><tr><td> <h3>Soil Moisture Sensors</h3> </td> <td> <ul><li>Provides an accurate estimate of how much water is available in the soil rootzone where water is actually absorbed by the turf</li> <li>Calibrated soil moisture threshold can be adjusted to fit the user’s preference</li> <li>Some models provide the capability to isolate other zones from the soil moisture sensor</li> </ul></td> <td> <ul><li>Some are available as wireless models, but most models require a small amount of digging and trenching of wire back to the existing in-ground valves</li> <li>Installation and calibration procedures must be followed closely to maximize water-savings potential of the sensor</li> <li>User must remember where sensor is installed when performing other lawn care practices like aerification</li> </ul></td> </tr></tbody></table><p>Rain sensors and soil moisture sensors bypass scheduled irrigation programs completely due to either significant rainfall or sufficient soil moisture – essentially turning off the controller (Figure 3). Smart controllers utilize historical, or current, regional weather data to make adjustments for the scheduled irrigation program. Most smart controllers utilize Wi-Fi to communicate with local weather stations to adjust program runtimes, while others may come with a weather sensor to utilize on-site weather data for making runtime adjustments. Your property may have multiple irrigated zones including areas like gardens, trees, shrubs, and ornamental &amp; bedding plants that may require more frequent watering than turfgrasses. Upgrading your sprinkler timer to a smart irrigation controller or installing a soil-moisture sensor in the lawn, are two ways to isolate the yard from these other irrigated zones. <a href="https://irrigation.org/swat" target="_blank">The Irrigation Association</a> and the <a href="https://www.epa.gov/watersense/product-search" target="_blank">EPA Water Sense program</a> have resources to help you locate and learn more about these specific technologies.</p> <div class="callout-image-caption"> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-drupal-entity media--view-mode-"><div alt="Soil moisture sensor user-interface add-ons" data-embed-button="media_browser" data-entity-embed-display="media_image" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="f9ed8914-01b8-407f-87da-d12ca52ef083" title="Soil moisture sensor user-interface add-ons" data-langcode="und" class="embedded-entity"> <img src="/sites/turf.umn.edu/files/files/media/fig_3_5.jpg" alt="Soil moisture sensor user-interface add-ons" title="Soil moisture sensor user-interface add-ons" typeof="foaf:Image" /></div> <figcaption>Figure 3. Soil moisture sensor user-interface add-ons which connect to the existing irrigation timer providing communication between the in-ground sensor and the timer. In these photos, the dial for in timer is in the RUN position; however the sprinkler system will not run because, as indicated in the yellow circles, watering has been suspended (left) or the timer is been turned off (right) due to sufficient soil moistue in the turfgrass rootzone. Additionally, each of these user interfaces allow the calibrated soil-moisture threshold to be adjusted (+/-) by the user.</figcaption></figure></div> <div class="callout-image-caption"> </div> <p>Finally, one of the smartest irrigation practices to follow is to conduct an irrigation audit, whichyou should do this regardless of whether you have a traditional or smart irrigation system. We generally recommend this is conducted once every year, usually in the spring. As most irrigation programs run late overnight or during the early hours of the morning, it is likely unknown if the sprinkler system is even running properly and / or if water is being applied in an efficient manner. The first step in an irrigation audit is to run a manual cycle for each zone in your system, then you will be able to make sure all the heads are aligned correctly to prevent unnecessary watering of impervious surfaces and other non-target areas. During the manual cycle also check for any broken heads / nozzles and for leaks that may be coming from underground around fittings, valves, and joints. Once all the heads are aligned and all leaks have be repaired, you can begin the catch-cup test; information on how to perform that test is <a href="https://extension.umn.edu/lawncare/auditing-home-lawn-irrigation-systems" target="_blank">provided here by UMN Extension</a>. Once you have completed the test you can program the runtimes and then let the rain sensor, soil moisture sensor, or smart irrigation controller take it from there.</p> <p>July isn’t the only month of the year to practice smart irrigation. In fact, you should start every spring by auditing your sprinkler system and evaluating each zone for any leaks and repairs that will need to be made before you begin programming zones for the summertime heat. After you finish the auditing procedure you may be just fine keeping your system turned off, for your lawn at least, and turning it on only when you need to. If that’s not an option, then consider investing in a soil moisture sensor or upgrading to a smart controller and become a more intelligent irrigator and finer steward of a precious resource.</p> <h4>Further Reading:</h4> <p>Cardenas-Lailhacar, B. and M.D. Dukes. 2008. Expanding disk rain sensor performance and potential irrigation water savings. J. Irrig. Drain. Eng. 134:67-73.</p> <p>Cardenas-Lailhacar, B. and M.D. Dukes. 2012. Soil moisture sensor landscape irrigation controllers: A review of multi-study results and future implications. Trans. ASABE. 55:581-590.</p> <p>Carrow, R.N. 2006. Can we maintain turf to customers’ satisfaction with less water? Agric. Water Manag. 80: 117-131.</p> <p>Dukes, M.D. and D.Z. Haman. 2017. Residential irrigation system rainfall shutoff devices, or rain sensors. UF/IFAS Extension. Bul. ABE325.</p> <p>Dukes, M.D., M. Shedd, and B. Cardenas-Lailhacar. 2015. Smart irrigation controllers: How do soil moisture senor (sms) irrigation controllers work? UF/IFAS Extension. Bul. AE347.</p> <p>Fender, D.H. 2008. Urban turfgrasses in times of a water crisis: benefits and concerns. In: J.B. Beard and M.P. Kenna, eds., Water quality and quantity issues for turfgrasses in urban landscapes. Council for Agricultural Science and Technology, Ames, IA. p. 11-31.</p> <p>Grabow, G.L., I.E. Ghali, R.L. Huffman, G.L. Miller, D. Bowman, and A. Vasanth. 2013. Water application efficiency and adequacy of ET-based and soil moisture-based irrigation controllers for turfgrass irrigation. J. Irrig. Drain. Eng. 139:113-123.</p> <p>Leinauer, B. and D.A. Devitt. 2013. Irrigation science and technology. In: J.C. Stier, B.P. Horgan, and S.A. Bonos, editors, Agronomy Monograph 56 Turfgrass: Biology, Use, and Management. American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America: Madison, WI. p. 1075-1131.</p> <p>Leinauer, B. and R. Green. 2011. Water management technologies. In S.T. Cockerham and B. Leinauer, eds., 2011. Turfgrass water conservation. <em>University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources</em>. 2nd edition. Publication 3523:101-112</p> <p>Meeks, L., M.D. Dukes, K.W. Migliaccio, and B. Cardenas-Lailhacar. 2012. Long term expanding-disk rain sensor accuracy. J. Irrig. Drain. Eng. 138:16-20.</p> <p>Muñoz-Carpena, R. 2018. Field devices for measuring soil water content. UF/IFAS Extension. Bul. BUL343.</p></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_tags" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-tags"> <div class="flex-display-list field field--name-field-dl-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/586" hreflang="en">Dan Sandor</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/11" hreflang="en">Irrigation</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/36" hreflang="en">Lawn</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/861" hreflang="en">soil moisture sensors</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/866" hreflang="en">rain sensors</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/871" hreflang="en">smart controllers</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/876" hreflang="en">irrigation audit</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 radix-layouts-sidebar panel-panel"> <div > </div> </div> </div> </div> </div><!-- /.brenham-flipped --> Mon, 05 Aug 2019 21:28:00 +0000 monc0003 1776 at https://turf.umn.edu If you build it, who will come? Evaluating the diversity of bees in flowering lawns https://turf.umn.edu/news/if-you-build-it-who-will-come-evaluating-diversity-bees-flowering-lawns <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">If you build it, who will come? Evaluating the diversity of bees in flowering lawns</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/286" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">monc0003</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sun, 02/03/2019 - 19:58</span> <div class="panel-display brenham-flipped clearfix"> <div class="container-fluid"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-12 radix-layouts-header panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_publish_date" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-publish-date"> <div class="field field--name-field-dl-publish-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item"><time datetime="2019-02-03T19:45:00Z" class="datetime">Sun, 02/03/2019 - 19:45</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-8 radix-layouts-content panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-dl-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><div class="callout-image-caption"> </div> <div class="callout-image-caption">By James Wolfin</div> <div class="callout-image-caption"> </div> <div class="callout-image-caption"> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-drupal-entity media--view-mode-"><div alt="a lawn with self-heal and white clover mixed in with turfgrasses" data-embed-button="media_browser" data-entity-embed-display="media_image" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="39afcdda-5be8-4664-9f3f-a2a25fe3ef21" title="self-heal, white clover and turfgrass" data-langcode="und" class="embedded-entity"> <img src="/sites/turf.umn.edu/files/files/media/fig_1_2.jpg" alt="a lawn with self-heal and white clover mixed in with turfgrasses" title="self-heal, white clover and turfgrass" typeof="foaf:Image" /></div> <figcaption>Figure 1. Bee lawn at Kenwood Park in Southwest Minneapolis.</figcaption></figure></div> <div class="callout-image-caption">When you close your eyes, and envision the “perfect” front lawn, what comes to mind?  If I had to guess, I’d imagine that you are envisioning a lush, low-cut grass, with a deep green color that is uniform and free of weeds across the entirety of the landscape.  This is what our societal norm and culture have taught us to believe; that the perfect lawn is flawless in four distinct features: density, color, coverage, and texture.  What the average land manager or homeowner may not consider is: How can this landscape function as an ecosystem within my community?  How can we support our pollinators within the turf lawn?  How can we implement management practices to make lawncare more sustainable and also support wildlife within our communities?  The University of Minnesota Turfgrass Science lab has teamed up with the University of Minnesota Bee Lab to answer these questions through a project commonly referred to as “the bee lawn” project.</div> <p>The ultimate goal of the bee lawn project is quite simple: we want to reimagine the American vision for the turf lawn such that land managers may alter their turfgrass management practices to reduce inputs and support our bee-loved pollinators.  Bee lawns (Figure 1) are turfgrass areas that include low-growing flowers that wild bees and honey bees use as forage for nectar and pollen.  Through this project, we are comparing two types of lawns: lawns with pre-existing stands of Dutch white clover (<em>Trifolium repens) </em>and lawns that have been experimentally enhanced with a seed mix that contains Dutch white clover, self-heal (<em>Prunella vulgaris)</em>, and creeping thyme (<em>Thymus sepryllum)</em>.  To determine the effectiveness of the experimental seed mix, a paired park design was used.  First, Minneapolis was split into four distinct quadrants: Northeast, Northwest, Southeast, and Southwest.  In each quadrant, there were two parks, one clover-only park, and one florally-enhanced park.  Floral enhancements were not applied until after the first field season in 2016.  In 2016, bees were collected off of naturally-occurring patches of Dutch white clover only, such that a baseline level of bee diversity could be recorded for each park.</p> <p>In the fall of 2016, parks were florally enhanced with the seed mix via a dormant seeding in the late fall.  Sections of parks with low foot traffic, high visibility, and low to moderate levels of shade were selected for the seeding.  Floral enhancement sites were prepared with two methods of pre-seeding disruption, scalping and aeration.  Scalping a lawn involves mowing the turf down to a height of one inch or less.  Mowing turf down to this height before dropping flower seed improves the chances that flower seed will be able to make contact with the ground, improving the likelihood of germination.  Aeration is the process of removing cores of soil from the ground to increase the flow of air, water, and nutrients throughout the surface, which also improve likelihood of germination.  After these two practices were imparted onto the lawn, flower seed was spread evenly across an 800 m<sup>2 </sup>area at each of the florally-enhanced parks.  In following field seasons, bee surveys were conducted at both clover-only parks, and florally-enhanced parks.  In the 2017 field season, enhancements were successful at only two out of four parks.  In 2018, enhancements were successful at three out of four parks.</p> <div class="callout-image-caption"> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-drupal-entity media--view-mode-"><div alt="Shannon's diversity graph" data-embed-button="media_browser" data-entity-embed-display="media_image" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="a02678bf-d31e-4f82-93e8-58bca9a83e17" title="Shannon's diversity graph" data-langcode="und" class="embedded-entity"> <img src="/sites/turf.umn.edu/files/files/media/fig_2.png" alt="Shannon's diversity graph" title="Shannon's diversity graph" typeof="foaf:Image" /></div> <figcaption>Figure 2. Bee diversity at clover-only (untreated) parks and florally-enhanced parks. Shannon’s entropy is an index used by ecologists to measure community diversity within a habitat or specific area.</figcaption></figure></div> <p>In total, 3507 bees were collected throughout the three year survey of bees on lawn flowers.  Fifty-seven unique bee species were collected off of Dutch white clover, while 60 unique bee species were collected off of florally-enhanced lawns.  When comparing bee diversity at clover-only parks and florally-enhanced parks, we observed a trend where enhanced parks had greater bee diversity than clover-only parks (Figure 2).  In addition to comparing which sites had greater bee diversity, we also analyzed trends in flower use to see if different bee communities existed on Dutch white clover and the enhancement flowers (Figure 3).  Our results indicated that distinct bee communities existed on the white clover as compared to the bees on the self-heal and the creeping thyme.   </p> <div class="callout-image-caption"> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-drupal-entity media--view-mode-"><div alt="graph of bee communities and host plants" data-embed-button="media_browser" data-entity-embed-display="media_image" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="2518d42a-f8f7-4b7d-9900-2b542afe7019" title="graph of bee communities and host plants" data-langcode="und" class="embedded-entity"> <img src="/sites/turf.umn.edu/files/files/media/fig_3.png" alt="graph of bee communities and host plants" title="graph of bee communities and host plants" typeof="foaf:Image" /></div> <figcaption>Figure 3. Visual interpretation of the bee communities observed on Dutch white clover (Trifolium) and self-heal and creeping thyme (Prunella + Thymus). The axes on this graph hold no quantitative units, but simply allow for the mapping of communities in a two-dimensional space.</figcaption></figure></div> <div class="callout-image-caption"> </div> <p>This research gives significant insights as to how land managers can progress their lawn sustainability practices to support our pollinators.  Previous efforts to improve the sustainability of lawn care have shown that using low-input grasses can reduce the amount of irrigation, fertilizer, and mowing required to maintain a healthy lawn.  The results from this study indicate that allowing flowers to grow in a low-input lawn, or intentionally seeding flowers into a lawn, can support a diverse community of insect pollinators.  Lawns with just Dutch white clover supported greater than 10% of all the bee species observed in the state of Minnesota.  Furthermore, lawns florally enhanced with Dutch white clover, self-heal, and creeping thyme saw greater bee diversity than clover-only lawns, with distinct bee communities utilizing the self-heal and creeping thyme.  With this in mind, we encourage homeowners and land managers from all backgrounds to embrace the flowers they see in their lawn, and even consider planting additional flowers, as they provide valuable forage to the honey bees and wild bees of our urban landscapes.</p></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_tags" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-tags"> <div class="flex-display-list field field--name-field-dl-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/546" hreflang="en">James Wolfin</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/131" hreflang="en">Bee Lawn</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/36" hreflang="en">Lawn</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 radix-layouts-sidebar panel-panel"> <div > </div> </div> </div> </div> </div><!-- /.brenham-flipped --> Mon, 04 Feb 2019 01:58:00 +0000 monc0003 1651 at https://turf.umn.edu University of Minnesota Turfgrass team in the media 10/15/18 https://turf.umn.edu/news/university-minnesota-turfgrass-team-media-101518 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">University of Minnesota Turfgrass team in the media 10/15/18</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/286" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">monc0003</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 10/15/2018 - 12:58</span> <div class="panel-display brenham-flipped clearfix"> <div class="container-fluid"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-12 radix-layouts-header panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_publish_date" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-publish-date"> <div class="field field--name-field-dl-publish-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item"><time datetime="2018-10-15T12:15:00Z" class="datetime">Mon, 10/15/2018 - 12:15</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-8 radix-layouts-content panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-dl-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Check out our team’s latest efforts in educating the public about our work.  We have a podcast, a Yard and Garden post and a newly-revised Extension article!</p> <p>WCCO’s <a href="https://wccoradio.radio.com/media/audio-channel/10-13-18-smart-gardens" target="_blank">Smart Gardens October 13 podcast</a> features Jon Trappe, Mary Meyer and Jared Gamm who answer listeners' questions on gardening and lawns</p> <p>UMN Extension's Yard and Garden blog features a post - <a href="http://blog-yard-garden-news.extension.umn.edu/2018/10/should-i-mulch-or-bag-my-leaves-this.html" target="_blank">Should I mulch? Or bag my leaves this fall?</a> - by Jon Trappe</p> <p>As part of UMN Extension's new website, the article <a href="https://extension.umn.edu/lawn-care/fertilizing-lawns#when-to-use-1257612" target="_blank">Fertilizing lawns</a> has been updated</p> <p> </p> <p> </p></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_tags" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-tags"> <div class="flex-display-list field field--name-field-dl-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/506" hreflang="en">Jon Trappe</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/36" hreflang="en">Lawn</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/436" hreflang="en">Fall</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 radix-layouts-sidebar panel-panel"> <div > </div> </div> </div> </div> </div><!-- /.brenham-flipped --> Mon, 15 Oct 2018 17:58:00 +0000 monc0003 1601 at https://turf.umn.edu Which fine fescue should you use? https://turf.umn.edu/news/which-fine-fescue-should-you-use <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Which fine fescue should you use?</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/286" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">monc0003</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 09/03/2018 - 11:22</span> <div class="panel-display brenham-flipped clearfix"> <div class="container-fluid"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-12 radix-layouts-header panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_publish_date" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-publish-date"> <div class="field field--name-field-dl-publish-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item"><time datetime="2018-09-03T11:00:00Z" class="datetime">Mon, 09/03/2018 - 11:00</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-8 radix-layouts-content panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-dl-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>By Eric Watkins</p> <p>I often get asked what I’d recommend for a good fine fescue mixture for Minnesota. I usually recommend a mixture of the three fine fescue species that are most readily available: hard, Chewings, and strong creeping red. The tricky part is determining the final components of a fine fescue mixture that will result in a high-performing turf.</p> <h4>Full Sun</h4> <p>In the full sun conditions our research plots experience, there are consistent and clear differences in performance.  When I was rating plots recently, hard fescue was the top performing species, and all the hard cultivars looked really good. They had very few weeds, weren’t affected by disease pressure, and had a nice, uniform appearance. I can’t recall a summer in Minnesota when the hard fescues weren’t the top performing species. The poorest performing fine fescue this summer in Minnesota is strong creeping red fescue. This species doesn’t handle summer stress very well, and is susceptible to a number of diseases. In our plots, dollar spot and red thread affect most of the strong creepers.</p> <p> </p> <div alt="fine fescue research plots" data-embed-button="media_browser" data-entity-embed-display="media_image" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-uuid="75952854-6d77-40df-9d04-36429917394a" title="" data-langcode="und" class="embedded-entity"> <img src="/sites/turf.umn.edu/files/files/media/fullsizerender.jpg" alt="fine fescue research plots" typeof="foaf:Image" /></div> <p>This picture shows these differences pretty well. You can see that the hard fescue plots have excellent turf density and a nice green color, while the strong creeping red fescue plots have significant damage from disease and are allowing weeds to become established. As you can see in the picture, Chewings fescues were intermediate to the hard and strong creeping red fescues. They can also get dollar spot and red thread, but not to the same degree as the strong creepers. The Chewings fescues seem to handle heat and drought better than the strong creepers as well. In recent years, we have noticed that Chewings fescue is more susceptible to damage caused by prolonged ice cover than are the other fine fescues.</p> <p>If these same grasses were growing in a different location, the results would probably be quite different. For instance, hard fescue seems to be quite susceptible to summer patch, a disease that is infrequent in Minnesota but a major problem in areas with higher levels of summer heat and humidity, such as the Mid-Atlantic region. This is a problem that researchers at Rutgers University are working on as part of our <a href="http://lowinputturf.umn.edu/" target="_blank">SCRI fine fescue research project</a>.</p> <h4>Shade</h4> <p>If these grasses were growing under tree shade, I’d expect the hard fescues to lag behind both the Chewings fescues and the strong creeping red fescues. Hard fescue can handle one aspect of tree shade quite well (lack of water due to tree root competition), but it doesn’t fare as well when experiencing the decreased light quality present under a tree canopy. Dominic Petrella, a postdoctoral researcher in our group, is currently investigating the effects of light quality on these grasses.</p> <h4>Recommendation</h4> <p>In summary, for a full sun lawn in Minnesota, I’d recommend approximately (by seed weight in a mixture):</p> <ul><li>40% hard fescue</li> <li>40% Chewings fescue</li> <li>20% strong creeping red fescue</li> </ul><p>If tree shade is a significant issue, I’d recommend:</p> <ul><li>40% Chewings fescue</li> <li>40% strong creeping red fescue</li> <li>20% hard fescue</li> </ul><p>Regardless of the type of grass you choose to seed, it is important to consult <a href="http://turf.umn.edu/research/cultivarevaluation">locally collected data</a> and <a href="http://turf.umn.edu/news/finding-right-grass-seed">make wise purchasing decisions</a>.</p></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_tags" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-tags"> <div class="flex-display-list field field--name-field-dl-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/416" hreflang="en">Eric Watkins</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/6" hreflang="en">Fine fescue</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/36" hreflang="en">Lawn</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/571" hreflang="en">Dominic Petrella</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 radix-layouts-sidebar panel-panel"> <div > </div> </div> </div> </div> </div><!-- /.brenham-flipped --> Mon, 03 Sep 2018 16:22:00 +0000 monc0003 1566 at https://turf.umn.edu Lawn care: 'Tis the season...Finally! https://turf.umn.edu/news/lawn-care-tis-seasonfinally <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Lawn care: &#039;Tis the season...Finally! </span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/286" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">monc0003</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 05/03/2018 - 17:09</span> <div class="panel-display brenham-flipped clearfix"> <div class="container-fluid"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-12 radix-layouts-header panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_publish_date" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-publish-date"> <div class="field field--name-field-dl-publish-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item"><time datetime="2018-05-03T17:00:00Z" class="datetime">Thu, 05/03/2018 - 17:00</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-8 radix-layouts-content panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-dl-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p></p><div data-embed-button="media_browser" data-entity-type="media" data-entity-embed-display="media_image" alt="Person mowing a lush green lawn" title="Mowing a lawn" data-entity-uuid="3ebd8086-25ec-4aa9-867f-66e03b2dfef7" data-langcode="und" class="embedded-entity"> <img src="/sites/turf.umn.edu/files/files/media/p6193871.jpg" alt="Person mowing a lush green lawn" title="Mowing a lawn" typeof="foaf:Image" /></div> Wondering what you can do for your lawn now that it's finally spring?  Extension educator Sam Bauer will give you some spring lawn care tips! <p>Find out more at the University of Minnesota Extension Yard and Garden News blog -  <a href="http://blog-yard-garden-news.extension.umn.edu/2018/05/lawn-care-tis-seasonfinally.html" target="_blank">Lawn care: 'Tis the season...Finally!</a></p></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_tags" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-tags"> <div class="flex-display-list field field--name-field-dl-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/86" hreflang="en">Sam Bauer</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/36" hreflang="en">Lawn</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/396" hreflang="en">lawn care</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/556" hreflang="en">spring</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 radix-layouts-sidebar panel-panel"> <div > </div> </div> </div> </div> </div><!-- /.brenham-flipped --> Thu, 03 May 2018 22:09:42 +0000 monc0003 1511 at https://turf.umn.edu University of Minnesota Turfgrass team in the media 4/24/18 https://turf.umn.edu/news/university-minnesota-turfgrass-team-media-42418 <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">University of Minnesota Turfgrass team in the media 4/24/18</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/286" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">monc0003</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 04/24/2018 - 17:49</span> <div class="panel-display brenham-flipped clearfix"> <div class="container-fluid"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-12 radix-layouts-header panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_publish_date" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-publish-date"> <div class="field field--name-field-dl-publish-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item"><time datetime="2018-04-24T17:45:00Z" class="datetime">Tue, 04/24/2018 - 17:45</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-8 radix-layouts-content panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-dl-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Check out our team’s latest efforts in educating the public about our work.  We have a newscast segment, a video, several podcasts and an article!</p> <p>WCCO’s Good Question: <a href="http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/category/watch-listen/wcco-tv-shows/good-question/" target="_blank">What Does This Extended Winter Mean for Our Lawns?</a> featuring Sam Bauer</p> <p><a href="http://winningedits.com/hyperlink-radio-beyond-beekeeping/" target="_blank">Beyond Beekeeping</a> podcast interview by Mindy Holahan Peters featuring James Wolfin</p> <p><a href="http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/audio/smart-gardens-with-denny-long/" target="_blank">WCCO’s Smart Gardens</a> featuring Jon Trappe on March 24, and Sam Bauer on March 10 and March 3</p> <p>GCSAA TV Live - SNA: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVsKroA80JA" target="_blank">How Sprayer Systems Strengthen BMP Initiatives</a> featuring Sam Bauer with Ken Rost who is the Founder, CEO, and Spray Technology Specialist with Frost INC.</p> <p>MGCSA Hole Notes January/February 2018: <a href="https://www.mgcsa.org/Hole-Notes-Magazine" target="_blank">Article thick-skinned: Sam Bauer interview</a> by Matt Cavanaugh</p></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_tags" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-tags"> <div class="flex-display-list field field--name-field-dl-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/86" hreflang="en">Sam Bauer</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/506" hreflang="en">Jon Trappe</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/546" hreflang="en">James Wolfin</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/551" hreflang="en">winter</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/36" hreflang="en">Lawn</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/131" hreflang="en">Bee Lawn</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 radix-layouts-sidebar panel-panel"> <div > </div> </div> </div> </div> </div><!-- /.brenham-flipped --> Tue, 24 Apr 2018 22:49:00 +0000 monc0003 1506 at https://turf.umn.edu Turf Species for Minnesota Home Lawns https://turf.umn.edu/news/turf-species-minnesota-home-lawns <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Turf Species for Minnesota Home Lawns</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/286" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">monc0003</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 01/05/2018 - 11:52</span> <div class="panel-display brenham-flipped clearfix"> <div class="container-fluid"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-12 radix-layouts-header panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_publish_date" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-publish-date"> <div class="field field--name-field-dl-publish-date field--type-datetime field--label-hidden field__item"><time datetime="2018-01-05T11:45:00Z" class="datetime">Fri, 01/05/2018 - 11:45</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-8 radix-layouts-content panel-panel"> <div class="panel-panel-inner"> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_body" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-body"> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-dl-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Sam Bauer and Parker Anderson of the University of Minnesota have created an infographic that profiles different turfgrass species for use in Minnesota home lawns. This is a great resource to educate homeowners on the characteristics, maintenance, and recommendations of these grasses for specific uses such as under low maintenance or shade conditions. </p> <p><a href="/sites/turf.umn.edu/files/files/media/turfgrass_infographic_1.pdf" target="_blank">Turf Species for Minnesota Home Lawns infographic</a></p></div> </div> <div data-block-plugin-id="field_block:node:dl_news_blog:field_dl_tags" class="block block-layout-builder block-field-blocknodedl-news-blogfield-dl-tags"> <div class="flex-display-list field field--name-field-dl-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/86" hreflang="en">Sam Bauer</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/476" hreflang="en">Parker Anderson</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/36" hreflang="en">Lawn</a></div> <div class="flex-display-list-item field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/401" hreflang="en">turfgrass</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 radix-layouts-sidebar panel-panel"> <div > </div> </div> </div> </div> </div><!-- /.brenham-flipped --> Fri, 05 Jan 2018 17:52:00 +0000 monc0003 1481 at https://turf.umn.edu