golf

July 17, 2018

The University of Minnesota Turfgrass Science Team has partnered with the Minnesota Golf Course Superintendents Association (MGCSA) to perform on-site research determined by the members themselves. As part of this project, we conducted a study at TPC Twin Cities, Fox Hollow Golf Club, and The Wilderness at Fortune Bay. We examined the following research question: Is there is any benefit to late season application of plant growth regulators?

July 13, 2018

The University of Minnesota Turfgrass Science Team has partnered with the Minnesota Golf Course Superintendents Association (MGCSA) to perform on-site research determined by the members themselves. As part of this project, we conducted a study at the Stillwater Country Club in 2017. We examined the following research question: How well would turfgrass species other than creeping bentgrass work under wet and shaded condition on a Par 3 tee box?

April 16, 2018

The University of Minnesota Turfgrass Science Team has partnered with the Minnesota Golf Course Superintendents Association (MGCSA) to perform on-site research determined by the members themselves. As part of this project, we conducted a study at the Rush Creek Golf Club in 2017. We examined the following research question: Will early spring paclobutrazol applications eliminate annual bluegrass?

March 30, 2018

The University of Minnesota Turfgrass Science Team has partnered with the Minnesota Golf Course Superintendents Association to perform on-site research determined by the members themselves. As part of this project, we conducted a study at the Medina Country Club and the Les Bolstad Golf Course in 2017. We examined the following research question: Will installing covers during a February warm-up reduce the risk of injury to annual bluegrass due to deacclimation?

November 30, 2017

By Parker Anderson, Research Scientist, Science of the Green Initiative, University of Minnesota

Recently, the Science of the Green Initiative at the University of Minnesota, in partnership with the United States Golf Association (USGA), collected data on golf pace of play to examine the impacts of green speed on pace of play at seven golf courses of differing characteristics around the United States. The implications of the data collected, however, are far greater than just measuring the time each player spent on the putting greens; the results have additional value regarding golf facility sustainability and productivity.

November 14, 2017

By Parker Anderson, Research Scientist, Science of the Green Initiative, University of Minnesota

In May of 2017, to address the challenges the golf industry faces, the United States Golf Association laid out their “Road Map to 2025” which sets the goals of improving golfer satisfaction by 20% while reducing critical resource consumption by 25% by 2025 (USGA, 2017b). Golf industry trends indicate that more golf courses are closing than are being opened, management costs are increasing, participation rates are flat or declining, and consumer behavior is changing (Licata and Tiger, 2010; NGF, 2017). It is critically important for golf course managers to identify factors that prevent golfers from participating in the game (Petrick, 2001).

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