Fine fescue

October 10, 2018

by Yinjie Qiu

Fine fescues are often planted in mixtures, rather than as a single species, because the different species have complementary characteristics that work together to form a good quality turf stand. Yet when fine fescues are planted in mixtures, it is difficult to establish final community composition because the species are so similar morphologically. We are working on a technique to quickly determine fine fescue mixture species composition, which will benefit turfgrass researchers across the country.

September 3, 2018

By Eric Watkins

I often get asked what I’d recommend for a good fine fescue mixture for Minnesota. I usually recommend a mixture of the three fine fescue species that are most readily available: hard, Chewings, and strong creeping red. The tricky part is determining the final components of a fine fescue mixture that will result in a high-performing turf.

July 22, 2018

By Michael Laskowski

Have you ever wondered where all the salt goes after the snow and ice melts from the roadsides and sidewalks? It turns out, most of the salt runs into the storm drain, but some salt will end up along the roadsides and boulevards in green areas.

December 11, 2017

By Jon Trappe

Many plant enthusiasts have observed difficulty planting some plant species around black walnut trees.  Black walnut trees naturally excrete chemicals into their environment to make themselves more competitive.  This negative plant-on-plant interaction is known as allelopathy, and is more common in multiple plant species than was once previously thought. 

There have been a few reports (Bertin et al., 2009; Bertin et al., 2003) of natural weed suppression in certain fine fescues (Festuca spp.).

December 7, 2017

By David R. Herrera

NASA scientist Cristina Milesi estimates that there is three times the amount of turfgrass in the United States as there are acres of irrigated corn [1]. When we consider that the rate of grass seed density required for turf can be up to 6 lbs per 1000 sq.ft, one can imagine the enormous quantity of seed needed to plant all that turf! Most of that planted grass seed is, at least here in the Midwest, Kentucky bluegrass. However, there is a grass genus that has gained interest and may one day be used just as much or more as Kentucky bluegrass.

September 21, 2017

Fine fescue turfgrass species are excellent alternatives to provide functional turf areas while reducing inputs of water, fertilizer, mowing, and pesticides.  Eric Watkins recently received a $5.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture to identify ways to facilitate adoption of these fine fescues on private and public landscapes.

September 18, 2017

By Dominic Petrella

Before I came to the University of Minnesota I had never actually seen a fine fescue golf green in person.  I’ve always had the impression that fine fescue species could only produce a suitable greens surface in climates similar to Ireland, the U.K., or the Pacific Northwest of the U.S.  Recent research, however, is helping me to realize that fine fescues could be suitable for golf greens in Minnesota (or similar Midwest locations) that want a lower input option.

September 19, 2016

By: Jonah Reyes, Research Scientist

Image 1: 12” Drip line above MNST-12 sod and seed.
Image 1: 12” Drip line above MNST-12 sod and seed. (Photo: Jonah Reyes)

January 8, 2016

The 2015 Cultivar Evaluation Results are now available and published online.  To view these results, click the “Cultivar Evaluation Results” tab under the Research section on the left of this webpage.  Clicking this link will initially bring you to the 2015 data page, but you can view archived data from 2007-2013 as well.

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