Turfgrass Science News

rust on plantUniversity of Wisconsin Turfgrass Rust Research

by Garett Heineck

Previously I wrote about the different renovation options for fall seeding of lawns and about the various attributes of cool-season lawn grasses.  This week I wanted to discuss the mixtures and blends of grass seed that are on the consumer marketplace.  If you’ve ever walked into your local big box store or garden center looking for grass seed, the different products available can be fairly intimidating.  To be honest, I often have a difficult time finding the right mixture, because it only takes one bad ingredient to produce a poor quality lawn.

Lawns in Minnesota take a beating.  This is no surprise due to the extreme weather swings that we have from season to season and even within seasons.  Fortunately this year has been a banner year for lawn care with plenty of rain, mild temperatures and low dew points.

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What is Turfgrass Science?

The University of Minnesota's Turfgrass Science Program conducts field-based research and offers education and consultation to both commercial turfgrass managers and homeowners caring for their yards.

For turfgrass or home lawn questions, contact:

Sam Bauer
Assistant Extension Professor
sjbauer@umn.edu or 612-626-3085
Sam Bauer

 

Dr. Brian Horgan
Professor
bphorgan@umn.edu or 612-624-0782
Dr. Brian Horgan

 

For degree questions, contact:

Dr. Eric Watkins
ewatkins@umn.edu or 612-624-7496
Dr. Eric Watkins